SPEAKERS

2019 Theme: Information Accessibility

Teresa Blankmeyer Burke

Keynote Speaker: Wood and Glass: Windows, Barriers, and Borders

Teresa Blankmeyer Burke, Ph. D., is Associate Professor at Gallaudet University, a bilingual university American Sign Language and English institution serving deaf, hard of hearing, and hearing students in Washington, DC. She is the only signing deaf philosopher in the world with a doctorate in philosophy. Her publications cover a wide range of genres , including peer-reviewed scholarship in philosophy and bioethics, journalism, creative nonfiction, as well as poetry in American Sign Language and English. She has served on a number of national and international committees for a variety of organizations, including the World Federation of the Deaf, the American Philosophical Association, the Hearing Loss Association of America, and the National Association of the Deaf (USA). Teresa divides her time between Washington DC and the historic neighborhood of Barelas in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and is currently working on a philosophical memoir about grief and resilience about her experience as a young widow and single mother in Cody, Wyoming.

This presentation uses the academic disciplines of deaf studies and philosophy as lenses for thinking through questions about information and inclusion. While most information transcends borders eventually, there are pockets of communities where that trickle of information takes much longer, such as the signing deaf community. In this talk, Professor Burke will include narratives about her own journey, including the barriers to information as a deaf philosopher, including experiences as a library patron and graduate student, plus barriers to information outside of libraries, including the everyday knowledge (doxa) of enculturation in academic and information spaces. Talk will be given in ASL.

daniel Rotsztain

Closing Speaker: Distorted Cartographies

Daniel Rotsztain is the Urban Geographer, an artist, writer and cartographer whose work examines our relationship to the places we inhabit. The author of All the Libraries Toronto, a colouring book featuring every branch of Toronto Public Library, Daniel now sits on Toronto Public Library’s Board of Directors. A regular columnist for CBC radio’s Here and Now where he discusses day trips exploring the natural beauty and cultural dynamism of Southern Ontario, Daniel’s work has also been featured in Spacing Magazine, the Globe and Mail and Now Magazine. A recent graduate of the University of Guelph”s Master of Landscape Architecture program, his thesis focused on enhancing local strip mall landscapes for pedestrians, forming the basis of plazaPOPS, a project implementing community-designed strip mall gathering spaces in Scarborough. 

Maps are powerful communication devices that necessarily distort the world to express useful information about it. This talk will explore how maps have been used as tools of power in imperialism and settler-colonialism, while suggesting ways that the art of cartography can be employed for social justice and art. Beyond maps, the talk hypothesizes that exaggeration, distortion, and emphasis are inherent in all communication. Throughout the talk, I will share ways I have built on this concept within my art and design practice.

Cora Cole

Session Speaker: Empowering Authors Through Open Access and Self-Publishing

Cora is the Founder and CEO of GreyLit, a software company that gives a voice and a stage to frontline research and information by allowing it to be searched, shared and reviewed around the world. After nearly 20 years as a Public Health Epidemiologist, Cora wanted to help organizations make better decisions faster, and to turn research into action months and years sooner. So she left the healthcare industry to venture into the world of start-ups and technology. Her learning curve has been steep, with plenty of ups and downs on the entrepreneurial roller coaster but her passion for knowledge mobilization continues.

This presentation will talk about the global movement toward open access and will share the latest news and debates regarding open access including Plan S, and the University of California vs Elsevier.   The impact of the open access movement is well articulated for academic journals and publishers of those journals, but this presentation will talk about the impact on grey literature.

Librarians know there is a world of information outside of the academia-the world of grey literature that holds equally insightful and valuable clues that impact patients, programs and policies. Librarians and producers of grey literature know that if it could be accessed consistently it would, in fact, change the way research is published and information is shared.  This begs the question; could open access bring insightful grey literature to the surface where it can be found quickly and consistently? This presentation will describe open access as an opportunity to empower librarians, authors and producers of front-line information and research with practical self-publishing tips and insights.

Jean Laroche

Session Speaker: The Two Sides of Information Access

Jean Laroche is a veteran reporter. He’s covered 6 Nova Scotia governments, so far, in a career that began at CBC Montreal in 1983. He has hounded politicians in three provinces and one territory over the span of his almost 4 decades as a reporter.

Jean Laroche, reporter, and Carla Heggie, Information Access & Privacy Professional, will discuss access to government information from two viewpoints- as requestor; as responder. Drawing from their mutual experiences of working with information access and privacy legislation, they will share their insights on the pros, cons, frustrations, and joys of working within the world of access.

Carla Heggie

Session Speaker: The Two Sides of Information Access

As a certified Information Access & Privacy Professional, Carla Heggie has been involved with the development and delivery of IAP legislation and policy for over 30 yearas; spoken across Canada on privacy, access, IM, and the IAP profession; and delivered IAP training in the government corporate, and academic arenas. She has administered the NS FOIPOP Act for both the Province of Nova Scotia and Dalhousie University. An Adjunct professor at Dalhousie, she teaches two graduate courses in privacy in the School of Information Management. Her company, Teal Creative Thinking, offers consultation in the areas of information access, privacy, policy, process, and patient advocacy.

 

Jean Laroche, reporter, and Carla Heggie, Information Access & Privacy Professional, will discuss access to government information from two viewpoints- as requestor; as responder. Drawing from their mutual experiences of working with information access and privacy legislation, they will share their insights on the pros, cons, frustrations, and joys of working within the world of access.

Bianca Mercer

Session Speaker: Accessibility Issues for Criminalized Women: An Alternative

Bianca Mercer is a first voice narrative expert, an advocate for criminalized women and a jails and prison abolishment activist, fighting to make change and create alternatives for incarceration in Canada. Bianca is a Dalhousie University student pursuing her education and dream to become a lawyer. She also works as a research assistant for Mount Saint Vincent University.

RobIn Parker

Session Speaker: Health Information Across the Access Continuum

Robin Parker works as an Evidence Synthesis and Information Services Librarian at the W.K. Kellogg Health Sciences Library and supports undergraduate and postgraduate medical education at Dalhousie’s Faculty of Medicine as well as other researchers across Dalhousie working on evidence synthesis projects.. Her research interests include review methods, search filters, and librarians’ teaching approaches.

Health librarians practicing in academic and health care settings will explore information accessibility using current health topic examples. They will illustrate how information access impacts a range of consumers including learners, clinicians, policy makers, patients, and caregivers. The panelists will detail how their respective library settings implement collaborative solutions to address these impacts.

Katie McLean

Session Speaker: Health Information Across the Access Continuum

Katie McLean is a Librarian Educator at Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA) where she focuses on supporting health professional education and managing the NSHA Library Services’ web presence. She has worked across different types of libraries for over 10 years, specializing in information literacy instruction and outreach.

Health librarians practicing in academic and health care settings will explore information accessibility using current health topic examples. They will illustrate how information access impacts a range of consumers including learners, clinicians, policy makers, patients, and caregivers. The panelists will detail how their respective library settings implement collaborative solutions to address these impacts.

Lara Killian

Session Speaker: Health Information Across the Access Continuum

Lara Killian is a Librarian Educator based at the Nova Scotia Hospital. She uses her expertise in plain language, health literacy, and project management to lead development and maintenance of the provincial health authority’s collection of patient and family education documents.

Health librarians practicing in academic and health care settings will explore information accessibility using current health topic examples. They will illustrate how information access impacts a range of consumers including learners, clinicians, policy makers, patients, and caregivers. The panelists will detail how their respective library settings implement collaborative solutions to address these impacts.

Nicole marcoux

Student Speaker: Education not Incarceration: Information Resources as Alternatives to Prison

Nicole Marcoux is currently a first year MLIS student, with a focus on libraries, information access, and health sciences librarianship. She completed an undergraduate degree in Russian Studies in 2014.

Steven McDonald

Student Speaker: The Right to be Forgotten: The Potential Effects on Canadian Archives

Steven McDonald is Dalhousie MLIS 2020 candidate with a focus on applying geographic information system (GIS) to information management and promoting the importance of collecting and making geographic data accessible. He completed his undergrad with a dual major in anthropology and geography and received his certificate in GIS techniques from Laurentain University.   

Nicole Slipp

Student Speaker: Using Tweets as a Measure of Sponsor Engagement: Halifax Pride 2018

Nicole Slipp is a first-year student in Dalhousie's MLIS program with an interest in libraries, archives, and researching queer communities and/or social media. She is currently a Reference Intern at the Killam Library and a Library Assistant at Halifax Central Library. Nicole has a PhD in English (Medieval Literature) and additional research interests in feminist and queer theory, kink, and comics studies.

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